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Pâte Brisée Recipe

Pâte Brisée Recipe

The rich flavor, delicate texture, and versatility of pâte brisée have made it the standard at Martha Stewart Living and in this book, where it is used for pies and tarts both sweet and savory. An all-butter pâte brisée tastes best, but some cooks use shortening or lard for additional tenderness. The name pâte brisée means “broken pastry,” and refers to cutting the butter into the flour, either by hand or with a food processor. The butter-flour mixture should resemble coarse meal, with some pieces of butter the size of small peas, before cold water is drizzled into it; these bits of unincorporated butter give pâte brisée its famously flaky texture by releasing steam as they melt.

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • ¼-½ cup ice water

Directions

Pulse flour, salt, and sugar in a food processor (or whisk together by hand in a bowl). Add butter, and pulse (or quickly cut in with a pastry blender or your fingertips) until mixture resembles coarse meal, with some larger pieces remaining. Drizzle ¼ cup water over mixture. Pulse (or mix with a fork) until mixture just begins to hold together. If dough is too dry, add ¼ cup more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and pulse (or mix with a fork).

Divide dough in half onto two pieces of plastic wrap. Gather into 2 balls, wrap loosely in plastic, and press each into a disk using a rolling pin. Refrigerate until firm, well wrapped in plastic, 1 hour or up to 1 day. (Dough can be frozen up to 3 months; thaw in refrigerator before using.)

Shortening Variation: Replace ½ cup (1 stick) butter with ½ cup cold vegetable shortening, cut into small pieces.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup ice water

Pulse flour, salt, and sugar in a food processor (or whisk together by hand in a bowl). Add butter, and pulse (or quickly cut in with a pastry blender or your fingertips) until mixture resembles coarse meal with some larger pieces remaining. Drizzle 1/4 cup water over mixture. Pulse (or mix with a fork) until mixture just begins to hold together. If dough is too dry, add 1/4 cup more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and pulse (or mix with a fork).

Divide dough in half onto two pieces of plastic wrap. Gather into two balls, wrap loosely in plastic, and press each into a disk using a rolling pin. Refrigerate until firm, well wrapped in plastic, 1 hour or up to 1 day. (Dough can be frozen up to 3 months thaw in refrigerator before using.)


Before starting this Shortcrust Pastry recipe, make sure you have organised all the necessary ingredients.

On your kitchen worktop, sift the flour and shape into a fountain . Add the diced butter.

With your fingertips, work the ingredients following the rubbing in technique.

Shape the preparation into a fountain and place the egg yolk in the centre.

Gently work with your fingertips, incorporating the flour gradually, adding a little water.

Add the remaining flour gradually.

. until a ball forms. Work the dough, stretching and regathering it (this technique is also known as ' fraisage '), to obtain a homogeneous consistency. Make sure you do not work the dough too much, as this would make it more breakable.
Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes before rolling out.


    • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more as needed
    • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
    • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter, preferably cultured, cut up and chilled
    • 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon vegetable shortening, chilled
    • 1 large egg
    1. In a mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the flour, salt, butter, and shortening on low speed until crumbly. With the machine running, add 2 tablespoons cold water and the egg. Beat just until the dough comes together in large clumps.
    2. Divide the dough in half and press each half into a 1-inch-thick round disk. Wrap each tightly in plastic and refrigerate until firm, at least 1 hour or up to 3 days let stand at room temperature for 15 minutes before rolling. Alternatively, the dough can be frozen for up to 1 month thaw in the refrigerator overnight.
    3. For each crust, on a lightly floured surface with a lightly floured rolling pin, roll 1 piece of dough into a 10-inch round. Carefully transfer the dough to an 8-inch round fluted tart pan with a removable bottom, pressing the dough gently against the bottom and up the sides. If necessary, trim the edges against the rim.
    4. Line the dough with foil, then fill with dried beans or pie weights. Freeze overnight, or until very hard.
    5. To blind bake a tart shell, preheat the oven to 375°F.
    6. Bake the frozen crust until the edges are set, about 20 minutes. Remove the foil and beans. Poke holes all over the bottom of the crust with a fork, then return to the oven. Bake until the bottom is set and the crust is blonde, about 8 minutes. Let cool in the pan on a rack.

    Reprinted with permission from Home Cooking with Jean-Georges: My Favorite Simple Recipes by Jean-Georges Vongerichten with Genevieve Ko. Copyright © 2011 by Jean-Georges Vongerichten photographs copyright © 2011 by John Kernick. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved.

    Jean-Georges Vongerichten is one of the most influential chefs in the world, having single-handedly redefined haute French cuisine, lightening and refining it by adding select Asian accents. He is the chef-owner of dozens of restaurants in fourteen cities around the world. His flagship restaurant, Jean Georges, at New York's Columbus Circle, is one of six restaurants in the United States to have been awarded three coveted Michelin stars it received four stars from the New York Times. The winner of multiple James Beard Foundation awards, he lives in New York City and Waccabuc, New York, with his family.

    Genevieve Ko is a cookbook author and the senior food editor at Good Housekeeping magazine. She has written for Martha Stewart Living, Gourmet, and Fine Cooking and lives in New York City with her family.


    Paté Brisée Sucrée Recipe

    This Paté brisée sucrée recipe will create the most delicious French pastries for you as it is a much richer short crust pastry than the paté brisée so making it the lightest of pastries for your sweet tarts such as raspberry tarts.

    Paté Brisée Sucrée Recipe
    Makes Special Raspberry Tarts

    It is mouthwatering with a delicious taste and texture so this is one recipe you will want in your recipe collection.

    This pastry is very much like the paté brisée but has sugar and egg yolks added which is why it is a richer pastry and is delicious for fruit tarts.

    Before you venture to make your paté brisée sucrée recipe you need to know that the sugar makes the dough more crumbly and difficult to handle and for this reason people seem to shy away from making it.

    But stick with it and you will have the most gorgeous of light pastries for your favourite tarts.

    It is often called paté sablée or sandy pastry. -)

    Place the flour, confectioner's sugar, and salt into a large baking bowl.

    Add the butter and using your finger tips, rub the butter and flour together until it resembles breadcrumbs. Do this very quickly to prevent the butter from softening.

    Add the water and egg mixture until the mixture sticks together.

    If the mixture is a little dry add a few drops of water.

    Now proceed to what the French call the "fraisage", but as the dough will be difficult to handle, you can use a piece of plastic wrap to place the dough on. Then push the dough away from you with the heal of your hands until it is smooth.

    Wrap in the plastic and place in the refrigerator for 2 hours.

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    To make flans and French tarts you will need to make a pastry shell.

    Some ideas for using your recipe for French tarts are:

    For fruit tarts you may wish to have a delicious਌reme patissiereਏilling.


    1: Crumble cold butter quickly

    I like to freeze my butter to keep it cool for making pie crusts. I defrost the butter for approximately 20 minutes in a kitchen at 65ºF/18ºC until it is just soft enough to cut into cubes with a chef’s knife.

    I first coat the butter cubes with flour. Then I push the butter cubes with the tines of a fork to break up the butter as much as I can before I touch the butter with my warm fingers.

    When I crumble the butter into the flour with my hands, I work as quickly as possible. I aggressively crumble the butter between my fingers until I get a texture that looks like bread crumbs. It has pea-sized pieces of butter and that’s OK.

    I’m not looking for perfection. I simply need the butter to be evenly distributed throughout the flour as quickly as possible without melting the butter too much.


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    Related Video

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    You can rate this recipe by giving it a score of one, two, three, or four forks, which will be averaged out with other cooks' ratings. If you like, you can also share your specific comments, positive or negative - as well as any tips or substitutions - in the written review space.

    Epicurious Links

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    Use of and/or registration on any portion of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated as of 1/1/21) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated as of 1/1/21).

    The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast.


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    9 Bake, cool, slice and serve

    Bake for about 70 minutes, until the internal temperature of the paté reaches 65-70C, or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out warm. Put a plate on top of the terrine, weigh it down with a couple of tins or similar, and leave to cool. Refrigerate, with the weights still on top, at least overnight, before turning out and serving.